luckypeach:

Last week we told you what happened to the figs from the ladies’ cover photo shoot. But I know what you were thinking: what end did that manly butternut squash meet?
The popsicles and pickles and sausages were easy enough to scarf, but you don’t just jam a huge butternut squash in your pie hole now, do you? No. You cook it the way Yotam Ottolenghi tells you to, because his is the only cookbook anyone uses anymore. Seriously, the internet is currently 45% people posting pictures of dishes from Jerusalem. We are no different: there’s a lot of good stuff in there. Like this: 
Roasted Butternut Squash and Red Onion with Tahini and Za’atar
INGREDIENTS
1 large butternut squash (2 1/4 lb. in total), cut into 3/4 by 2 1/2-inch wedges2 red onions, cut into 1 1/4-inch wedges3 1/2 Tbsp. olive oil3 1/2 Tbsp. light tahini paste1 1/2 Tbsp. lemon juice2 Tbsp. water1 small clove garlic, crushed3 1/2 Tbsp. pine nuts 1 Tbsp. za’atar1 Tbsp. coarsely chopped flat-leaf parsleyMaldon sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
PREPARATIONPreheat the oven to 475 degrees F.
Put the squash and onion in a large mixing bowl, add 3 tablespoons of the oil, 1 teaspoon salt, and some black pepper and toss well. Spread on a baking sheet with the skin facing down and roast in the oven for 30 to 40 minutes, until the vegetables have taken on some color and are cooked through. Keep an eye on the onions as they might cook faster than the squash and need to be removed earlier. Remove from the oven and leave to cool.To make the sauce, place the tahini in a small bowl along with the lemon juice, water, garlic, and 1/4 teaspoon salt. Whisk until the sauce is the consistency of honey, adding more water or tahini if necessary.
Pour the remaining 1 1/2 teaspoons oil into a small frying pan and place over medium-low heat. Add the pine nuts along with 1/2 teaspoon salt and cook for 2 minutes, stirring often, until the nuts are golden brown. Remove from the heat and transfer the nuts and oil to a small bowl to stop the cooking.
To serve, spread the vegetables out on a large serving platter and drizzle over the tahini. Sprinkle the pine nuts and their oil on top, followed by the za’atar and parsley.
Propriety requires me to tell you: this was reprinted with generous permission from Jerusalem: A Cookbook by Yotam Ottolenghi & Sami Tamimi, © 2012. Published by Ten Speed Press, a division of Random House, Inc.

luckypeach:

Last week we told you what happened to the figs from the ladies’ cover photo shoot. But I know what you were thinking: what end did that manly butternut squash meet?

The popsicles and pickles and sausages were easy enough to scarf, but you don’t just jam a huge butternut squash in your pie hole now, do you? No. You cook it the way Yotam Ottolenghi tells you to, because his is the only cookbook anyone uses anymore. Seriously, the internet is currently 45% people posting pictures of dishes from Jerusalem. We are no different: there’s a lot of good stuff in there. Like this: 

Roasted Butternut Squash and Red Onion with Tahini and Za’atar

INGREDIENTS

1 large butternut squash (2 1/4 lb. in total), cut into 3/4 by 2 1/2-inch wedges
2 red onions, cut into 1 1/4-inch wedges
3 1/2 Tbsp. olive oil
3 1/2 Tbsp. light tahini paste
1 1/2 Tbsp. lemon juice
2 Tbsp. water
1 small clove garlic, crushed
3 1/2 Tbsp. pine nuts
1 Tbsp. za’atar
1 Tbsp. coarsely chopped flat-leaf parsley
Maldon sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

PREPARATION
Preheat the oven to 475 degrees F.

Put the squash and onion in a large mixing bowl, add 3 tablespoons of the oil, 1 teaspoon salt, and some black pepper and toss well. Spread on a baking sheet with the skin facing down and roast in the oven for 30 to 40 minutes, until the vegetables have taken on some color and are cooked through. Keep an eye on the onions as they might cook faster than the squash and need to be removed earlier. Remove from the oven and leave to cool.To make the sauce, place the tahini in a small bowl along with the lemon juice, water, garlic, and 1/4 teaspoon salt. Whisk until the sauce is the consistency of honey, adding more water or tahini if necessary.

Pour the remaining 1 1/2 teaspoons oil into a small frying pan and place over medium-low heat. Add the pine nuts along with 1/2 teaspoon salt and cook for 2 minutes, stirring often, until the nuts are golden brown. Remove from the heat and transfer the nuts and oil to a small bowl to stop the cooking.

To serve, spread the vegetables out on a large serving platter and drizzle over the tahini. Sprinkle the pine nuts and their oil on top, followed by the za’atar and parsley.

Propriety requires me to tell you: this was reprinted with generous permission from Jerusalem: A Cookbook by Yotam Ottolenghi & Sami Tamimi, © 2012. Published by Ten Speed Press, a division of Random House, Inc.

luckypeach:

Hunger on the High Seas, Part 4

Spices + Chicken Wings + Hot Oil = SPICY BEACH PARTY MEAL!

(Super duper thanks to Danny Bowien of Mission Chinese Food for the recipe and the cameo. This video series was conceived of during a spice-fired Chongqing Chicken Wing hallucination!)

sexpigeon:

My drink has serious usability problems.

sexpigeon:

My drink has serious usability problems.

Pre-pre-served

Ma, the cupcake! Fuck!

Ma, the cupcake! Fuck!

(Source: werewolf--bar--mitzvah, via drugwar)

murketing:

(via Striped Photographs Created Entirely In-Camera by Painting the Set)

“”It’s part of our DNA,” says Walter Levy, author of “The Picnic: A History,” who points out that “picniclike” events appear in the writings of Ovid, Plutarch and Seneca.

"Picnics are taken very seriously at Balmoral"

thelivest1:

photograph by grant cornett

thelivest1:

photograph by grant cornett

thelivest1:

photograph by grant cornett

thelivest1:

photograph by grant cornett

thelivest1:

photograph by grant cornett

thelivest1:

photograph by grant cornett

thelostboywhobecameaman:

Kathryn Parker Almanas, Vestige, 2010, from the series Pre-Existing Condition; archival pigment print

thelostboywhobecameaman:

Kathryn Parker Almanas, Vestige, 2010, from the series Pre-Existing Condition; archival pigment print

(via likeafieldmouse)